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Young Stanford Graduate Cracks The Code

Aug 27, 2015

By Laura Duncanson
Dithapelo Medupe, who mostly goes by Ditha, is the type of girl that blends into her surroundings; she’s a quiet introvert who enjoys running, watching TV, reading and writing about African culture. But she is more than what meets the eye; she is the inventor of an African binary code based board game called “Temalo Code and Decode”.
Ditha grew up in the African country of Botswana and due to her academic excellence, was awarded a scholarship to do a post-secondary school year in America. During this opportunity, she was able to apply to universities in the United States and received a full scholarship to an Ivy League school Stanford University, to study premed. After Stanford, she went onto study medicine at St. George’s University which she has recently completed. When Good News Notebook Magazine asked about her biggest struggle adjusting between the schooling in Botswana and America she said the learning is a lot faster paced in America. She found herself utilizing study groups and resources that teach you how to study.

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The game first came to her during her years of undergrad at Stanford University, when she was studying premed and for a short time computer science. She was introduced to the binary code of computers which in a few years she saw a similar notion being used in African history. Becoming excited about her discovery, she began researching and compiling as much information as she could about publishing games. All of this led to the birth of “Temalo Code and Decode”, which is available for purchase online. Her discovery did not go unnoticed as she has had it featured in the US Journal of Mathematics and Culture.

She aspires to make her game well recognized and bring awareness to culture in a fun educational way. Since the game has been made, it has been successfully shipped from the US to UK and Africa. There has also been an interest spiked in the Ministry of Education in Botswana to evaluate the game for implementation in secondary schools throughout the country. This young woman is making strides in African innovation while juggling medical school. Outside of her game making, she is an active member of the African Student Association as well as a joint blogger for doctors and medical students from Botswana.

Her biggest influence is her mother who always encouraged her dreams and ideas from a very young age. She told a story about when she was 11 and had written a book, her mother took her to publishers to get the book known. Although it took a while, her book is being used in schools in Botswana as required reading for language classes. She credits all of her success to her mother who is a huge part of her life even until this day. The one person she would have liked to meet was Steve Jobs because of his inspirational can do attitude and self-starter spirit. In 5 years, she would like to be practicing medicine in Africa and on the road to specialty training. In terms of “Temalo Code and Decode”, her desire is that the game would be played in households and schools throughout Africa and would be something that is passed on through generations. At this time, she is already working on another form of the game and has more ideas in the making.
Her advice for our readers is that you have to believe in your dreams, “make sure you are well knowledgeable and research all you can so that you’re well informed. Only then will you be equipped to convince others”.

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The Desire and Determination Within

Mar 30, 2015

By Kevin Wilson
Derek Ogbeide JumpTraveling to countries, near and far, while maintaining his honor roll status, is nothing new for Derek Ogbeide. The native Lagos, Nigerian played soccer most of his life. Surprisingly, the son of Martin and Justina Ogbeide discovered a new desire.

On his 11th birthday, Derek received two leather basketballs from his father. The special gifts motivated him to put air in the balls and toss them against the wall, pretending that the wall were baskets. A year later, he moved in with his uncle, Victor Richard, nearby the prestigious Sports and Learning Complex in Landover, Maryland.

At 6’2, 13 years old, wearing size 13 shoe, he attended Kenmoor Middle School in the eighth grade. He admits that he made the team due to his height. Derek blocked shots without jumping, ran the floor graciously, while proudly wearing Number 55 on his first organized hoop team. Reporting to early AM practices on time, running suicides and being chastised was all a part of the process. Not once, did Derek complain. “I remember those days,” he said. In spite of losing a lot of games, he had a thirst to score, block shots and rebound.

Next stop, Toronto, Canada. Representing Monsignor Percy Johnson Catholic High School, the 6’5 center gradually improved, while earning A.A.U. recognition, and being highlighted on Hoops Hype Canada. Following his 10th grade year, his parents made a decision to have Derek go to Mableton, Georgia, and reside with his father. “I will always support Derek and his dream,” says Martin Ogbeide, who hold three college degrees.

Discovering a reputable A.A.U. team did not take long. Derek signed with the Southern Stampedes who’s sponsored by Nike EYBL. He honed his skills under Coach Patrick Harper, and played exceptionally well in the Peach Jam Classic. “Derek has an awesome personality on and off the court, he’s fun to be around, a good teammate, very strong work ethic and very motivated to be a great player,” says Harper, a skill development trainer.

Highly recruited by Ole Miss, Virginia Tech, Vanderbilt, Memphis, Tulane, Arizona, Houston and Georgia, the visit at the University of Houston he’ll treasure a lifetime. Derek met Rockets center Dwight Howard, another Nigerian and NBA Hall of Famer, Hakeem Alajuwon towards the end of his visit. That’s why he wears Number 34. It was a surreal moment, meeting and taking photos with Hakeem, Ogbeide gleefully stated.

When Derek arrived at Pebblebrook High School, a 6A school outside of Atlanta, in 2013, he was the tallest student in the school taking advance courses. “My side of the family are trees, everyone is over 6’4,” says the father, who’s 6’5. Derek’s height, desire and determination rapidly changed the complexion of the Falcons program. His dominating presence in the paint helped the Falcons to a 24-6 record, losing in the finale by six points at the Georgia Dome. “He’s a gym rat, a great ambassador for basketball and our school, he protects the rim and runs the floor better than any big man in America,” uttered Washington, a four year coach at Pebblebrook.

Senior year- competing against DeMatha, a nationally known team from Hyattsville, Maryland, Ogbeide did his job, tallying 14 points, 17 rebounds and 7 blocks, losing 61-54. In a great game, we spent a lot of our prep time addressing how we were to play against Derek. “He’s one of the most dominated post players that we have played against in a few years. He should have a very good career at Georgia,” said Stags coach Mike Jones.

Losing to Wheeler High, 59-58 in the 6A championship finale in Macon, Georgia on March 7 was a heart breaker. His last game in a Falcon uniform, the Georgia signer tallied 14 points, 22 rebounds and 7 blocks. “Without Derek all of our success would’ve not been possible,” says Preston Fulton, a senior guard. Ranked as one of the top ballers in Georgia, he looks forward to graduating in May, and starting his collegiate career in June. “I can’t wait to get better and reach higher heights at UGA”, says the 3.7 GPA student- who intends to major in Business Administration. “By the Grace of God, he has come a long way,” says his mother. The desire and determination continues.

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Usher Donates 100,000 New Children’s Books

Jan 5, 2015 0

Atlanta native and R&B Mogul, Usher, is known for his on-stage showmanship. But, recently, the GoodNews Notebook was captivated with his tremendous act of charity and service to the community. In conjunction with publisher Scholastic, Usher and the school publication magnate recently announced that a donation of 100,000 usher-scholastic-kids
new children’s books from The Scholastic Possible Fund will be donated to children in need this holiday season through three non-profit organizations that work to improve global literacy: Save the Children,Toys for Tots and Room to Read. The donation was made together with Usher and his New Look Foundation, a nonprofit organization that develops youth from underserved communities into global leaders. Usher recently joined with Scholastic to launch the new “Open a World of Possible” initiative, designed to elevate the importance and joy of reading for all children.

On November 6th 2014, eight-time Grammy Award-winning artist Usher hosted a live classroom webcast, viewed by close to 3 million students and their teachers, where he talked about the ways children can get involved in spreading the joy of reading. For their first call to action, students were asked to learn about three leading non-profit organizations and vote for the organization(s) they’d like to receive a donation of books. Each organization is receiving a portion of the donation from The Scholastic Possible Fund based on the students’ votes.
“We know from research that when children discover a book they love, they are motivated to read more, understand more, and learn more. When that happens, everything is possible,” said Dick Robinson, Chairman, President and CEO, Scholastic. “We applaud all the work that Toys for Tots, Save the Children and Room to Read do to ‘Open a World of Possible’ for children in the U.S. and around the world by giving them wonderful new books and stories to experience, enjoy, and own.”


SOURCE: Black Celebrity Giving.com | http://www.blackcelebritygiving.com/2014/12/usher-new-look-foundation-scholastic-possible-fund-donate-100000-new-childrens-books/

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TEENS: Top 3 Secrets To A Better Career.

Aug 20, 2014

Every student wants a good summer job. We agree. What’s better than cash in your pockets as you set off for vacation, head to the beach, or even, get ready to go back to school. Here are our top 3 helpful tips for teen who want to prepare now for a better career later:


#1 – Finish high school.
Nearly every job requires basic communication and math skills. Compared to workers at higher education levels, high school dropouts have more difficulty getting and keeping jobs. They also have lower earnings throughout their lives.

#2 – Consider continuing your education.
The more education you get, the higher your earnings are likely to be. On average, high school graduates earn more than high school dropouts. Those who receive postsecondary training earn more than high school dropouts and graduates. Moreover, workers who have bachelor’s or higher degrees usually earn more than those with less education.

#3 – Research career information.
A small investment of your time will help you make an informed career choice that could pay dividends throughout your life. There are hundreds of occupations, so choosing and planning a career is a lot more complex than it may appear. The ideal career for you might be something you’ve never heard of or thought about. The Occupational Outlook Handbook and other career publications are loaded with helpful information.

Adapted from Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Author Jon Sargent, Summer 1999.

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